Deanna

Saturday, 24 December 2016 14:56

Food Allergy vs. Food Intolerance

Food Allergy vs. Food Intolerance
 
I remember as a child eating my cereal for breakfast and then developing a tummy ache.  This would happen every morning until I stopped drinking the milk that was added to it.  Eventually, while in college, my roommate told me I must be lactose intolerant as this was something she was learning about in her kinesiology class.  Glad to have something to go on, I proudly renounced dairy from my food choices.  I have since come to learn a lot more about food sensitivities and intolerances.  Read on.
 
There are two different kinds of food sensitivities – food allergy and food intolerance. Often times, they are confused because they are both reactions to foods that we eat and some of the symptoms can be very similar. However, it’s worth taking a moment to distinguish their differences.
 
Saturday, 24 December 2016 14:32

Salsa with Cilantro and Lime

Tomato Salsa with Cilantro and Lime 
 
My friend Laura and I made this awesome batch of salsa a couple years ago and since then this recipe has become a family favourite.  Salsa takes some time to make, so getting together with a friend and doubling the batch makes the work that much more fun.  You will eat this stuff by the jar!  
 
 
 
 
12 to 14 500ml jars
8 to 12 hours - 2 1/2 to 3 hours working
 
8 quarts plum tomatoes
pickling salt
6 large onions (red are good if you can get them)
2 to 3 heads of garlic
450 grams (1 pound) Jalapeño peppers
6 large yellow peppers
2 1/2 cups minced cilantro
1/4 cup cumin seed, ground
1 156ml (5 1/2 ounce) can tomato paste
PER JAR 3 tablespoons lime juice
 
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Blanch the tomatoes by dropping them in the boiling water for 1 to 2 minutes. You will need to do them in batches. Transfer the tomatoes to a sink or tub filled with cold water.
 
Peel the tomatoes, and chop them coarsely. Layer them in a large strainer - such as comes in a set for cooking spaghetti - with the salt. I try to use about 4 tablespoons, but a bit more is okay. Much of it will run out with the water. Let the tomatoes drain for several hours to overnight, in a cool spot (but not in the fridge.) Don't forget to keep them a little raised from the bottom of whatever pot you strain them into, so they are not sitting in their own water.
 
When you are ready to proceed, put the canning jars into a large canner with water to cover them by one inch at least, and bring to a boil. Boil the jars for 10 minutes. If your water is very hard, add a shot of vinegar to the water to prevent lime build-up on the jars.
 
Meanwhile, peel and chop the onions, de-stem and deseed the Jalapeños (wear gloves!) and other green peppers, and peel and mince the garlic. Squeeze the juice from the limes and set it aside.
 
Take the strained tomatoes, and chop them to the texture you would like - a food processor is fine for this. Mix them with the chopped onions, garlic, and chiles in a large canning kettle or other large, deep pot. Chop the cilantro and mix it in, along with the ground cumin seed.
 
Mix the tomato paste with a cupful of the salsa, until it is lump-free. Mix it into the pot of salsa. Taste the salsa, and add some salt if you think it needs some more. Bring the salsa to a boil.
 
Lift the sterilized jars from the boiling water bath and empty them. Half should be emptied into the sink, and half should be emptied back into the pot to keep the boiling water level up.
 
Add three tablespoons of lime juice to each jar. Fill each jar with salsa, to within 1 cm of the rims. Wipe the sides of the jars.
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 13:20

Ginger Snaps

What's Christmas baking without Ginger Snaps?  Many of the recipes I found were loaded with sugar and oil, so I wanted to find a healthier recipe that would actually let the spices come through.  Healthier baking allows for a little indulgence.  These cookies fit the bill, the molasses gives them enough sweetness.
 
I have never made Gingerbread, but these little guys are a snap! The touch of sweetness comes from molasses, which is loaded with trace minerals.
 
Ginger Snaps
 
2 1/4 cups spelt flour (sifted)
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
2 1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp ground cardamom (optional)
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp cloves
2/3 cup dark molasses
1/2 cup melted coconut oil
 
Mix together in a medium sized bowl the flour, baking powder, baking soda, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves.
In a second bowl, cream together the molasses and melted coconut oil.
Fold the flour mixture into the liquid mixture a bit at a time and mix well until all the flour mixture has been added.
When mixed together, roll into balls.
Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment or use a stone.
You may want to press them down with a fork.
*Tip Dip the fork in water so it won't stick to the dough.
Bake at 350 for 11-14 min.
Wednesday, 07 December 2016 15:50

Cranberry Sauce

 

A Christmas Dinner would not be complete without the cranberry sauce, but I don't love all the added sugar and gelatin you find in the store bought canned versions.  My daughter and I make cranberry sauce every year over the holiday and often times the recipe will vary with what we might add to it like apples, oranges, pineapple, cinnamon, ginger or cloves.  

 

Not So Sweet Cranberry Sauce

Ingredients
2 bags of fresh cranberries (they are usually 12 ounce bags)
3/4 cup water
1/2 cup maple syrup stevia to taste
2 tsp cinnamon
tsp nutmeg
½ tsp cloves
Juice and zest of one orange

Directions
Put cranberries and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
Keep on medium heat, stirring constantly until the cranberries start to explode (about 10-15 minutes).
Reduce to a simmer and pour the juice and zest over the cranberry mixture, add in the maple syrup and stevia to taste.
Simmer 10-15 minutes and remove from heat.
Cool completely and store in fridge at least 4 hours but preferably overnight before serving.

NOTE: This is not as sweet as store versions. Taste at the end of cooking. Add a little more maple syrup if needed.

Friday, 25 November 2016 14:44

What is a Holistic Nutritionist?

As a Holistic Nutritionist, I help you work with your unique body, and take into consideration how everything in your life affects your health and wellness.

At the first glance, you may think what a Holistic Nutritionist does is not much different from a conventional dietician, or a diet program. However, there are some subtle nuances that make our approach superior in terms of creating positive changes that last – instead of delivering a Band-Aid solution.

As a Holistic Nutritionist:

  • I work with the concept of bio-individuality. My approach is client-driven. Instead of getting a one-size-fits-all meal plan based on a cookie-cutter approach or one fad diet, I create customized plans for my clients based on their individual circumstances, lifestyle habits, health condition and other needs. 
  • I approach nutrition as “whole foods”, instead of compartmentalizing them into individual nutrients such as calories, carbs, proteins, fats etc. Why? Because the synergistic relationship among these various components when they are ingested in the form of whole foods deliver much more benefits than when they are taken as individual nutrients.
  • With my nutrition program, during which I work with my clients over several months with sessions that last approximately 60 minutes, I am able to be with them every step of the way so that we are able to look into lifestyle choices and work on changing habits, resulting in meaningful and positive behavioral changes that last for a long time, delivering long-term health benefits.
  • My coaching is goal-, action- and result-oriented. My approach focuses on implementation and integration so that healthy changes are integrated into your life. We live in the age of information overload – you don’t need more information, you need to know which information to use and how to make them work for your life.
  • Instead of treating the symptoms, I work with my clients to get to the underlying causes of their health concerns. We look at how issues such as stress, emotional distress, physical activities, lack of “soul nourishment” etc. affect our overall wellbeing. I help my clients cultivate the awareness to improve all areas of their lives.
  • I support my clients to work with their body on healing itself so that they can eventually reduce the amount of medication that they rely on.
  • Instead of forcing my clients to stick to some “plan” which does not work for them, I first listen to my clients’ needs and concerns, then work with them to get over blocks or resistance, making any behavioural changes they make, stick.

My programs are available in person in my office in Owen Sound or online across the country.  Digestion, Food Sensitivities, Energy and Hormone Balance, Weight Loss and Wellness. 

 

Tuesday, 15 November 2016 19:22

Curried Cauliflower Lentil Soup

I love to make delicious soups this time of year, almost as much as my family loves to eat them.  I must admit, it hasn't quite been cold enough to feel like soup weather.

Curried Cauliflower Lentil Soup

1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp ginger root, minced
1 tbsp coconut oil
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp coriander
2 tbsp green chilli paste
4 cups vegetable broth
2 cups cauliflower washed and chopped into bite size pieces
1 cup red lentils
1 large sweet potato, peeled and cubed
2 cups raw spinach

Saute the onion, garlic, and ginger in the coconut oil.

Add the coriander, cumin, and curry, then add the vegetable broth.

Add in the red lentils, sweet potato and cauliflower along with the spinach.

Sea salt and pepper to taste.

Let simmer till the vegetables are soft. Approximately 30 minutes. Enjoy.

Monday, 17 October 2016 17:33

Food Sensitivities

Does this sound like you or your loved ones?
Do you wake feeling fatigued and unable to get out of bed?

Perhaps you suffer from Flu-like symptoms; muscle and joint pain, depression, and mental confusion; brain fog, sore throat or swollen lymph nodes.

Chronic fatigue, arthritis, colitis, IBS, fibromyalgia and other immune disorders have become common diagnoses. Many of the people who develop immune disorders were once naturally energetic, highly motivated individuals who woke up one day and realized their body had crashed, barely able to walk, think or function like they once did.

Since the mid-1990’s Food Allergies have gone from being pretty rare to very common. An estimated 6-8% of children under the age of 3 in Canada now have food allergies. That’s approximately 30,000 children and the numbers continue to rise.

Certain factors can predispose a person to develop food allergies such as genetics. (One or both parents are allergy sufferers.)
The second -most common cause of the development of sensitivities is poor digestion. If a food is not being properly digested, it may eventually begin to trigger a sensitivity reaction in the body.

A Food Allergy occurs when the immune system mistakenly identifies a food as a harmful substance and launches an attack against it. This triggers the release of antibodies whose goal is to destroy and eliminate the food (bad guy) through different responses in the body.
It involves the excess production of an IgE Antibody which triggers the release of histamine and other chemicals from cell tissues producing various sensitivity symptoms.

These antibodies create the symptoms of a food allergy such as rash or hives, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, itchy skin, shortness of breath, chest pain and anaphylaxis.
Although a person can develop allergies to practically any substance, the most common allergens include pollen, dust, dust mites, animal dander, feathers, cosmetics, mould, insect venom, chemicals, drugs, and foods.
Peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, milk and dairy products, eggs, wheat and soy are the most common food allergens.

An allergic response is fast and very noticeable. The reactions can change very quickly from mild to severe in the worse cases causing anaphylactic shock and closing of the airway. (Often found with peanut and shellfish allergies).

A Food Intolerance occurs when an ingredient or compound in a food irritates a person’s digestive system or when a person is unable to properly digest the food. But, wait.... all of the above symptoms can be present with a food intolerance too.

There are a number of factors that may influence food intolerance. In some cases, as with lactose intolerance, the person lacks the chemicals to properly digest certain proteins found in food. While food allergies can be triggered by the smallest amount of the food in question, food intolerances are sometimes dose related and may not occur unless the person intolerant consumes a large portion of the food. For example, a person with lactose intolerance may be able to drink milk in coffee but will become sick if she drinks an entire glass of milk.

Keeping a food journal and tracking what you ate when symptoms occur can generally help diagnose food intolerances. Another way to diagnose food intolerance is to go on an elimination diet, which involves completely eliminating any suspect foods from your diet until you are symptom-free.
You then begin to reintroduce the foods, one at a time. This can help you pinpoint which foods cause symptoms. Seek the advice of your health care provider/ Holistic Nutritionist before beginning an elimination diet to be sure your diet provides adequate nutrition.

There are several ways to decipher Food Intolerances. Electrodermal Screening is a safe and effective, non-invasive way to test for food intolerances, then determine how to help the body properly digest these foods.

I'm interesting in helping my body deal with food sensitivities and intolerances!  Click HERE!

Deanna Trask RHN

Registered Holistic Nutritionist and EAV/EDS Practitioner

Tuesday, 11 October 2016 20:15

What does a Holistic Nutritionist do?

What does a Holistic Nutrition Consultant do?
Those trained in holistic nutrition evaluate their clients’ nutritional needs by identifying symptoms that may indicate health imbalances. They develop individualized health plans, which include nutrient-dense whole foods, lifestyle recommendations, and naturally sourced supplements, in order to bring the client’s health back into a state of homeostasis.

What will my sessions look like?
A Certified Holistic Nutritionist will create individualized meal plans and recipes for their clients, assist them in understanding food labels and provide them with grocery shopping advice. Each client’s stress levels, exercise routine, quality of sleep and relaxation, and overall lifestyle habits and practices, including smoking or alcohol consumption, are assessed. Deanna will dig a little deeper and help you to discover your triggers to overeating and work to address them if that is something that you struggle with. A Certified Holistic Nutritionist's client's progress is monitored and guidance is given to help them to achieve their health goals, but most importantly they educate and empower their clients, encouraging self-responsibility on the journey to health.

How do Holistic Nutritionists differ from a dietitian?
Unlike Dietitians, those trained in holistic nutrition are self-regulated and choose to forego a degree in Dietetics, rather their comprehensive training focuses on the sciences, bodily functions and symptoms, whole foods and quality food production, naturally sourced supplements, healthy lifestyle practices, and the body-mind connection.

What is the Education?
At CSNN, students complete 17 courses and are tested in each one. They are also required to prepare 14 detailed case studies, write a comprehensive three-hour national board exam, and must obtain an overall 80% average in order to graduate. CSNN Graduates follow a strict Scope of Practice and Code of Ethics, which gives them the ability to work collaboratively alongside both allopathic and alternative healthcare practitioners.

Is there any upgrading?
Deanna has furthered her education and completed her Electrodermal Screening education with world renown Naturopath Dr. Robert Cass at The Academy of International BioEnergetic Sciences in London, Ontario and Continued with a Raw Nutrition Course as well as a Sport's Nutrition Course.

What is a Certified Holistic Nutrition Consultant qualified to do?
After completing the Natural Nutrition Diploma Program, graduates are knowledgeable in all functions of the body, including the digestive and intestinal systems, the immune system, food intolerance and allergies, the causes of inflammation, and blood sugar regulation, to name a few. As a result, these professionals are a valuable resource for corporations, as they are able to lessen employee and healthcare plan costs and decrease sick days by reducing the effects of stress and many common health conditions.

How is information gathered?
Client information is obtained through consultations and questionnaires, thereby recommendations are tailored to each individual’s needs.

Will Deanna communicate with other members of my health care team?
Yes, if permission is granted to contact other members of your health care team.

How will I feel working with a Holistic Nutrition Consultant?
You will feel supported and confident that you are getting individualized nutrition to support your needs.

Will Deanna give me the Canada Food Guide?
NO, you will get a personalized meal plan designed to suit your lifestyle, family and health conditions including recipes, menus and specific foods to bring your body back into balance.

Will a Certified Holistic Nutrition Consultant recommend against medications that I am currently taking?
NO. Medications that are prescribed by your doctor must be taken as prescribed. It is out of the scope of practice for a Certified Holistic Nutritionist to recommend that medications are stopped.

Friday, 07 October 2016 15:10

Butternut Squash and Leek Soup

Butternut Squash and Leek Soup

This is one of my favourite fall recipes. I honestly can't believe I haven't shared it with you till now.
It's very simple to make and tastes delicious.

I make this one so often because everyone loves it!

1 tbsp Coconut Oil
1 large Butternut Squash
1 medium sweet potato
1 large onion
2 cloves of garlic
2 leeks, chopped
5 cups of chicken stock (I make my own, or use water and Bragg's Liquid Aminos)
1 cup of milk (cashew, almond, coconut)
Salt and Pepper
Bragg's Liquid Aminos

I am all about simplicity. So the hardest part here is going to be peeling that big squash. I like to section it first, then scoop out the seeds and peel it with a sharp knife.

Cut into cubes.

Peel and cube the sweet potato.

Chop up the onion, and mince the garlic.

Wash and chop two leeks.

In a large stock/soup pot melt the coconut oil and then saute the onion, leeks and garlic.
When softened, add the sweet potato, squash and chicken stock.

Cook on medium heat till the squash is soft.

When finished, take a hand blender and blend the soup till it is smooth.
On low heat, add the milk, salt and pepper and bragg's and season to taste. Turn off after 5 minutes and you are ready to enjoy.

Thursday, 06 October 2016 21:25

Fitness and Fat Loss Mistakes

Are you Making These Fitness and Fat Loss Mistakes?

Have you been doing cardio 3-4 times per week but haven’t been able to lose weight?
What you are about to read might strike you as controversial. All that moderate to intense steady state cardio you’ve been doing on cardio machines for 30-45 minutes, 3 to 4 times per week is doing more harm to your body than good. This type of cardio is not going to help you in your weight loss effort and if you are already stressed out (who isn’t?) it may even be causing negative effects to your health.

Before you get upset and start sending the hate email it is important for you to understand why.
In order for you to understand there are a few terms that require an explanation first:

Subcutaneous Fat:
Subcutaneous fat lies right below the outermost layer of the skin. It’s the fat you can pinch with your fingers and is tested with calipers.

Visceral Fat:
Visceral fat is also known as organ fat because it lies between the organs. In other words, visceral fat is located between the organs and contributes to belly fat.
Visceral fat negatively affects health by increasing inflammation (the silent killer) in the organs in part because it releases substances called adipokines which are cell to cell signaling proteins that increase blood pressure and mess with insulin regulation.
Visceral fat is also responsible for decreasing the amount of adiponectin within the body. Adiponectin is an essential fat burning hormone and when this hormone is decreased it means that there are more triglycerides ( the type of fat found in blood) getting into the blood stream.
The worst part about visceral fat is that it can degrade muscle leading to more fat.

Oxidative Stress:
Oxidative stress occurs when we release too many free radicals than can be neutralized by antioxidants. Normally, the body can handle free radicals, but if antioxidants are unavailable, or if the free-radical production becomes excessive, damage can occur. Of particular importance is that free radical damage accumulates with age. Free radicals are responsible for inflammation and cellular death.

So now that we got that out of the way let me explain why moderate to vigorous steady state cardio may not be the best choice when it comes to aerobic exercise.

Aerobic Training Raises Cortisol Levels.
In this day and age, it seems most of us will have chronically elevated levels of cortisol. This means that your body will store fat instead of burning it. The gain in fat will be visceral fat which increases fat accumulation and inflammation in the body.
Since aerobic exercise is known to increase inflammation in the body and when combined with the bad oxidative substances that are elevated by visceral fat it doesn’t make for a health enhancing combo.
It’s well known that exercise raises cortisol because exercise stresses the body, which in the case of strength training is a good thing because it stresses the body to grow or adapt and get stronger. In contrast, aerobic training stresses the body without boosting the anabolic hormones, resulting in an overall inflammation-causing situation.

Chronic Aerobic Exercise Can Raise Inflammation Within the Body
Chronic inflammation is a major health issue that ages tissues and has even been called the “secret killer!” It is connected to fat gain, heart disease, insulin resistance and diabetes, asthma, arthritis, cancer, poor reproductive health, and stomach problems. It’s different from acute inflammation following training or injury, which has a protective effect on the body by localizing blood to the damaged tissue and immobilizing you.
Chronic inflammation occurs when the cells are being repeatedly attacked by oxidative free radicals, elevated insulin, or high cortisol, to name a few. That’s why aerobic training causes chronic inflammation—your body produces free radicals in response to the oxygen-rich environment created by increased respiration that goes with aerobic training, and your cortisol is raised from repeated physiological stress.
It’s well established that aerobic exercises cause oxidative stress—a review article in the Journal of Sports Science provides a useful summary of how strenuous aerobic exercise induces oxidative stress that can overwhelm antioxidant defenses.
There’s widespread and accepted evidence of chronic inflammation from aerobic exercise as seen from the increase in free radicals, damage to lipids and DNA , and decreased blood measurements of antioxidants such as glutathione.

Long-Term Aerobic Exercise Compromises Immune System
Long-term aerobic exercise compromises the immune system. There is ample evidence that aerobic training leads to immune suppression, putting aerobic endurance athletes at greater risk for infection, particularly upper respiratory illness. The worst kind of aerobic exercise that leads to the most pronounced immune dysfunction is when the exercise is continuous, long (about 90 minutes a session), and of moderate to high intensity (60-80 percent of maximal oxygen uptake). Overreaching or intensified aerobic training leads to greater risk of illness and puts athletes at risk of longer lasting effects because overreaching also modifies hormone function among other things.

The Best Workout to Achieve Your Goal Weight
The very best protocol for visceral fat loss and a lean physique is high-intensity interval sprints and a resistance training program. This will allow you to burn visceral fat and build muscle. More muscle will elevate metabolism and support a better hormonal and biochemical environment by lowering adipokines—remember that evil chemical that creates more fat and breaks down muscle.

A dual program that combines HIIT, or at least strenuous aerobic training in conjunction with resistance training, is clearly essential for health. You’ll be getting rid of the unhealthy fat and building up an arsenal of muscle to protect against future fat attacks.

Top Three Thing You Can Do Instead of Aerobic Exercise

  • Strength Train
    You’ll build muscle, burn fat (it triggers growth hormone, which increases fat burning), lower cortisol and inflammation, and look better.
  • High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)
    You’ll burn fat—visceral belly and subcutaneous fat—and gain conditioning.
  • Take a Probiotic and Eat High Antioxidant Foods
    You’ll help your body detoxify from diet and environmental pollutants (they cause inflammation), and lower cortisol from daily stressors.

Information from this article was taken from www.charlespoliquin.com To read more about how to combat the negative effects of aerobic training visit Charles Poliquin’s research based blog.

Why not book a free 30-minute consult to learn more about my one one one weight loss programs.  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.