What do you do when your mood is off or you’re stressed to the max?

  Eat ice cream?  Binge watch Netflix?  Call your bestie?

  After reading this article, you may consider yogurt, a handful of walnuts, or maybe even some dark chocolate as your go-to mood-boosters and stress-busters.

  Today, we’ll unpack some of the exciting (and preliminary) new research about the link between your gut health and moods/stress. 
 
We’ll talk about your friendly resident gut microbes (mostly bacteria), probiotic foods and supplements, as well as foods to feed those gut microbes and probiotics (aka “prebiotics”). 

WHAT THE HECK ARE “GUT MICROBES?  ”

Oh, our friendly “gut microbes.” 

 They are the trillions of microbes that happily live in our gut. They help us by digesting foods, making vitamins, and even protecting us from the not-so-friendly microbes that may get in there.

  Believe it or not, these friendly microbes have mood-boosting and stress-busting functions too!


Published in Deanna's Blog
Saturday, 24 December 2016 14:56

Food Allergy vs. Food Intolerance

Food Allergy vs. Food Intolerance
 
I remember as a child eating my cereal for breakfast and then developing a tummy ache.  This would happen every morning until I stopped drinking the milk that was added to it.  Eventually, while in college, my roommate told me I must be lactose intolerant as this was something she was learning about in her kinesiology class.  Glad to have something to go on, I proudly renounced dairy from my food choices.  I have since come to learn a lot more about food sensitivities and intolerances.  Read on.
 
There are two different kinds of food sensitivities – food allergy and food intolerance. Often times, they are confused because they are both reactions to foods that we eat and some of the symptoms can be very similar. However, it’s worth taking a moment to distinguish their differences.
 
Monday, 17 October 2016 17:33

Food Sensitivities

Does this sound like you or your loved ones?
Do you wake feeling fatigued and unable to get out of bed?

Perhaps you suffer from Flu-like symptoms; muscle and joint pain, depression, and mental confusion; brain fog, sore throat or swollen lymph nodes.

Chronic fatigue, arthritis, colitis, IBS, fibromyalgia and other immune disorders have become common diagnoses. Many of the people who develop immune disorders were once naturally energetic, highly motivated individuals who woke up one day and realized their body had crashed, barely able to walk, think or function like they once did.

Since the mid-1990’s Food Allergies have gone from being pretty rare to very common. An estimated 6-8% of children under the age of 3 in Canada now have food allergies. That’s approximately 30,000 children and the numbers continue to rise.

Certain factors can predispose a person to develop food allergies such as genetics. (One or both parents are allergy sufferers.)
The second -most common cause of the development of sensitivities is poor digestion. If a food is not being properly digested, it may eventually begin to trigger a sensitivity reaction in the body.

A Food Allergy occurs when the immune system mistakenly identifies a food as a harmful substance and launches an attack against it. This triggers the release of antibodies whose goal is to destroy and eliminate the food (bad guy) through different responses in the body.
It involves the excess production of an IgE Antibody which triggers the release of histamine and other chemicals from cell tissues producing various sensitivity symptoms.

These antibodies create the symptoms of a food allergy such as rash or hives, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, itchy skin, shortness of breath, chest pain and anaphylaxis.
Although a person can develop allergies to practically any substance, the most common allergens include pollen, dust, dust mites, animal dander, feathers, cosmetics, mould, insect venom, chemicals, drugs, and foods.
Peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, milk and dairy products, eggs, wheat and soy are the most common food allergens.

An allergic response is fast and very noticeable. The reactions can change very quickly from mild to severe in the worse cases causing anaphylactic shock and closing of the airway. (Often found with peanut and shellfish allergies).

A Food Intolerance occurs when an ingredient or compound in a food irritates a person’s digestive system or when a person is unable to properly digest the food. But, wait.... all of the above symptoms can be present with a food intolerance too.

There are a number of factors that may influence food intolerance. In some cases, as with lactose intolerance, the person lacks the chemicals to properly digest certain proteins found in food. While food allergies can be triggered by the smallest amount of the food in question, food intolerances are sometimes dose related and may not occur unless the person intolerant consumes a large portion of the food. For example, a person with lactose intolerance may be able to drink milk in coffee but will become sick if she drinks an entire glass of milk.

Keeping a food journal and tracking what you ate when symptoms occur can generally help diagnose food intolerances. Another way to diagnose food intolerance is to go on an elimination diet, which involves completely eliminating any suspect foods from your diet until you are symptom-free.
You then begin to reintroduce the foods, one at a time. This can help you pinpoint which foods cause symptoms. Seek the advice of your health care provider/ Holistic Nutritionist before beginning an elimination diet to be sure your diet provides adequate nutrition.

There are several ways to decipher Food Intolerances. Electrodermal Screening is a safe and effective, non-invasive way to test for food intolerances, then determine how to help the body properly digest these foods.

I'm interesting in helping my body deal with food sensitivities and intolerances!  Click HERE!

Deanna Trask RHN

Registered Holistic Nutritionist and EAV/EDS Practitioner

Published in Deanna's Blog