Deanna

Friday, 15 November 2019 18:33

Hanging at the office

Hanging at the office today in my comfy clothes sipping homemade yogi tea.

I love hanging out here as it is so cosy and warm. I have lots of plants and crystals and the energy is just fabulous. You should pop by and see me some time. I love to help women reach their health goals with nutrition, mind and body connection and sometimes supplements too. You are all unique and therefore the approach taken should be customized for you. Mainly I help women work on their digestion, balance their hormones, sleep better, have more energy and feel good in their body. It's not about a size or how much weight you can lose but what you can change today to feel more healthy and vibrant.

I don't often put my face out there but I thought perhaps maybe you would like to get to know me a little better. I love good food, good wine and good chocolate. I also love to exercise and read good books. Though they are mostly about digestion and hormones. ;) I love the beach and being on the lake in my kayak or riding my bike are my happy places. I'm not big on winter, but I'm working on it. Dee

Thursday, 07 November 2019 17:16

Are you getting enough Vitamin D?

 
Vitamin D is an essential fat-soluble vitamin. It’s sometimes called the “sunshine vitamin” because our skin makes it when exposed to the sun. 
 
It’s also the most common nutrient deficiency! Like most vitamins, vitamin D has many functions in the body. It’s mostly known for its ability to help build strong bones. But, vitamin D is also important for a healthy immune system, digestive system, heart and mental health, blood sugar regulation, fertility, and resistance to cancer.
 
FUN FACT: Vitamin D is the vitamin with more scientific articles published since 2000 than any other vitamin.
Let’s talk about the many roles vitamin D has in promoting good health. We’ll also go over the different forms of vitamin D and what exactly is a deficiency. Finally, I’ll give you three sources of this critical nutrient and how much we should get.
 
Make sure you’re getting enough!
 
Vitamin D in the body
 
Vitamin D (calciferol) isn’t “active” in our bodies. To do its wonders, it first needs to be converted into the active form. This is a two-step process. First the liver converts it into 25(OH)D (calcidiol). Then, that is converted into 1,25(OH)D (calcitriol) in the kidneys. It’s this third, calcitriol, form that’s active in the body.
 
Vitamin D acts like a hormone! That means it’s produced in one part of the body (e.g. the skin), and travels through to act on another part (e.g. the bones).
 
Because vitamin D is fat-soluble, when you have more than enough, it gets stored in the liver, and isn’t flushed out in the urine like excesses of many other vitamins are.
 
FUN FACT: Fish liver oil contains vitamin D, but not fish oil - it’s the liver that stores vitamin D.
 
Vitamin D for bones
 
Vitamin D is most known for its importance for bone health. Bones are alive and are constantly remodeling themselves. This means they, as all tissues, need a constant supply of nutrients.
 
How does vitamin D help your bones?
 
Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium more efficiently. And the mineral calcium is one of the major players to “mineralize” and strengthen our bones.
 
FUN FACT: New research shows it’s not just the kidneys that activate 25(OH)D into 1,25(OH)D - Bone cells can do this too!
 
Vitamin D works with other hormones to ensure optimal levels of calcium in the blood. When it comes to calcium, the body always prioritizes the blood over the bones. This is because the blood transports calcium around the body for critical functions like contractions of the heart and muscles. This is why it’s more important to maintain the calcium levels in the blood over levels in the bone. 
 
When there is enough calcium in the blood, any excess is stored in the bones. This is when the bones are mineralized and strengthened. When there isn’t enough calcium in the blood two things happen to raise this level. First, vitamin D stored in the liver is activated to help absorb more calcium from food. Second, the body removes calcium stored in the bones to raise levels in the blood. 
 
When we don’t get enough vitamin D (and calcium) regularly, bones can become weak and brittle. In children, severe vitamin D deficiency can cause rickets, and in adults it can cause osteomalacia. With less severe vitamin D (and/or calcium) “insufficiency” (as opposed to a more severe “deficiency”), osteoporosis can develop over the long term.
 
Having enough 25(OH)D in the blood is associated with higher bone density. Studies show that supplementing with vitamin D may reduce the risk of falls and bone fractures.
 
FUN FACT: The strongest evidence for what vitamin D deficiency actually causes is with rickets and osteomalacia. The rest of the conditions have some evidence, but it’s not clear to what extent they’re caused by vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, or what other factors also come into play.
 
Vitamin D, the immune system, and inflammation
 
Several studies have shown a link between low levels of vitamin D and immune-related conditions like atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. In the lab, vitamin D seems to have “anti-inflammatory” and “antioxidant” properties.
 
FUN FACT: Inflammation is mostly caused by the response of our immune system.
 
Vitamin D can reduce immune response and inflammatory markers. Some studies in people with immune conditions (e.g. cystic fibrosis, multiple sclerosis, & obesity), show that supplementing with vitamin D reduces some inflammatory markers in the blood, although not all studies agree.
 
Some researchers think vitamin D, due to its effects on the immune system, may also help with serious food allergies. A few small studies show that children with low vitamin D levels have an increased risk for food allergies. More research is needed.
 
Vitamin D and digestive diseases
 
Since vitamin D is fat-soluble, it’s absorbed along with fat in the diet. So, people who don’t eat or absorb enough fat are at risk of lower vitamin D levels. This can include people with many digestive issues such as celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn’s & colitis, as well as people who have had gastric bypass surgery. 
 
Also, a healthy vitamin D status seems to go hand-in-hand with a healthy gut. For example, there is a link between sub-optimal vitamin D, gut microbiome status, gut inflammation, and diseases of the gut like IBD and colon cancer. 
 
Vitamin D and cancer
 
It’s not just colon cancer that’s associated with low levels of vitamin D. Higher levels of vitamin D are associated with lower risk for prostate, and breast cancers. 
 
In the lab, cancer cells don’t seem to do as well when exposed to higher levels of vitamin D. They don’t divide or invade other tissues as well; and, they seem to die easier.
 
It’s unclear whether supplementing with vitamin D would reduce the risks of cancer in people.
 
Vitamin D and heart health
 
Several studies have linked low levels of vitamin D in the blood with heart disease. 
 
Higher levels of vitamin D in the blood may reduce blood pressure and the risk of heart disease by a small amount. 
 
Supplementing with vitamin D may help lower blood pressure slightly, but the evidence isn’t clear on how supplementing affects risk of heart disease.
 
Vitamin D and blood sugar
 
Low vitamin D levels are associated with higher levels of insulin resistance in people without diabetes. It may also increase the risk of developing diabetes.
 
Supplementing with vitamin D may help improve blood sugar management in some people with diabetes.
 
Vitamin D for mental and brain health
 
Cells in key areas of the brain have “receptors” for vitamin D. Vitamin D also has a role in circadian rhythms and sleep, affects growth of nerve cells, and impacts the developing brain.
 
There is growing evidence of the links between low blood levels of 25(OH)D and symptoms of depression.
 
Some studies also show a link between low vitamin D levels and increased risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
 
Vitamin D and fertility
 
Vitamin D seems to help improve the motility and survival of sperm cells.
 
Both too high and too low levels of vitamin D in the blood seem to be associated with infertility.
 
Forms of vitamin D
 
Many vitamins come in more than one form. With vitamin D, it comes in two different forms: D2 and D3. There are small differences in their chemical structure.
 
FUN FACT: Both forms are activated the same way: to 25(OH)D and then 1.25(OH)D. 
 
Vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) is the plant-based form, while vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is from animals. Both forms can help rickets.
 
At higher doses, however, vitamin D2 is less potent than vitamin D3.
 
Sources of vitamin D
 
There are three main sources of vitamin D - sun exposure, foods, and supplements.
 
Sources of vitamin D - Sun exposure Our skin contains “pre” vitamin D. When exposed to UV rays from the sun, this “previtamin” is converted into vitamin D (calciferol).
 
In fact, vitamin D levels decline in people throughout the winter.
 
The problem is that too much UV radiation can contribute not only to skin cancer, but also to dryness and other cosmetic changes in the skin over time.
 
Let’s look at how to get enough vitamin D from foods and supplements. Sources of vitamin D - Foods Vitamin D is not naturally found in very many foods. The best sources include fatty fish and fish liver oils. Some is also found in beef liver, some cheeses, and egg yolks. Because these are animal sources, they are in the D3 form. Some is even already converted into 25(OH)D which is thought to be 5 times more potent than the regular D3 form.
 
Naturally occurring plant sources of vitamin D2 are some mushrooms that have been exposed to the sun. That’s about it.
 
Because it’s naturally found in so few foods, vitamin D is also added to certain foods. This is called “fortification.” In fact, fortified foods are the main source of dietary vitamin D in the US. 
 
Fortification of food with vitamin D can improve vitamin D status.
 
Some of these vitamin D fortified foods include milk, some orange juices, breakfast cereals, and yogurt. Check your labels to find out if yours has been fortified with vitamin D (it will be listed as an ingredient). You can also check which form of vitamin D was added: D2 or D3. 
 
Infant formulas in Canada and the US are required to have at least 40 IU of vitamin D for each 100 kcal.
 
FUN FACT: Because vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, absorption from foods, drinks, and supplements is improved when taken at the same time as a fat-containing meal.
Sources of vitamin D - Supplements Vitamin D supplements come in both forms: D2 and D3. The plant-based D2 form is manufactured by exposing yeast to UV radiation. The animal-based D3 form is made from lanolin. 
 
If you are at risk for vitamin D deficiency, your health care provider can test your blood for levels of 25(OH)D and recommend a course of action specific for you.
 
However, if you don’t have a professional recommendation for how much vitamin D to take, the safest way to supplement is to follow the instructions on the label. And never take more than 4,000IU/day (100 mcg/day), unless told to by your licensed health care provider. 
 
That’s because too much vitamin D can become toxic. One effect of too much vitamin D is that blood levels of calcium can get too high. This can lead to “calcification” which can damage blood vessels, the heart, and kidneys. Getting too much vitamin D is mostly a risk when taking supplements; not so much from sun exposure or food intake.
 
And don’t forget to check with your doctor and/or pharmacist if you’re taking medications because vitamin D supplements can interact with some of them.
 
In infants, since formulas must have vitamin D added to them, breastfed infants are often recommended vitamin D drops. Speak with your licensed healthcare professional for recommendations.
 
FUN FACT: Supplementing with vitamin D has not been consistently shown to correct many of the conditions listed above (except for rickets and osteomalacia). Some studies show improvements, while others don’t. While these conditions are associated with low blood levels of vitamin D, they are not always improved with supplements.
 
Vitamin D deficiency 
 
Studies show that between 30-80% of people simply don’t get enough vitamin D. This deficiency is so common that some researchers have called it a “public health concern” and a “global problem.”
 
Vitamin D deficiency is when someone has less than 30 nmol/L of 25(OH)D in the blood. Ideally you want at least 50 nmol/L (20 ng/L).
 
<30 nmol/L = deficient
30-50 nmol/L = insufficient
50-125 nmol/L = adequate
125+ nmol/L = high
 
Vitamin D deficiencies can happen when, over time, people are not getting enough safe sun exposure, or are not eating enough foods containing vitamin D. It can also happen if the vitamin D is not being absorbed very well, or if the kidneys have trouble converting the “previtamin” D into the active form 1,25(OH)D.
People who are more likely to be deficient in vitamin D include: 
Pregnant and lactating women, and breastfed infants;
Older adults;
People with limited sun exposure (including athletes who train indoors); 
People with darker skin;
People with digestion issues that prevent proper absorption (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, etc.);
People with obesity; and, 
People who have undergone gastric bypass surgery.
 
How much vitamin D do we need?
 
For adequate blood levels of 25(OH)D, how much vitamin D do we need to get every day?
 
To get enough vitamin D from the sun, a general rule is to get about 5–30 minutes of sun between 10:00 a.m. & 3:00 p.m. at least twice a week to the face, arms, legs, or back without sunscreen. 
 
When it comes to vitamin D from foods and supplements, in Canada and the US, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has set target daily amounts. This amount, called the “Recommended Dietary Allowance” (RDA), ensures that at least 97% of people get enough vitamin D every day. Those recommendations are:
 
10 mcg (400 IU) per day for infants under the age of one.
15 mcg (600 IU) per day for everyone aged 1-70 years old, including pregnant and lactating women.
20 mcg (800 IU) per day for everyone over the age of 70.
 
Vitamin D in foods and supplements may be measured in both mcg (micrograms) and/or IU (international units). The conversion factor is 40 IU = 1 mcg.
 
Summary
Vitamin D has many health-promoting roles in the body. Most of the evidence is for bone health, but it’s also associated with a healthy immune system, digestive system, heart and mental health, blood sugar regulation, fertility, and resistance to cancer.
 
Vitamin D is also the most common deficiency.
 
We can get vitamin D from sun exposure, some foods, and supplements. 
 
The best way to know how much vitamin D you need is to have your blood tested if you’re at risk. If you don’t have a test or professional recommendation, following the label directions on your vitamin D supplements can be a safe way to get enough.
Deanna Trask RHN 
Holistic Nutrition and Wellness
Serving Grey-Bruce Owen Sound and across Canada online
Top grade nutritionist approved supplements from professional lines only.
 
References:
 
Berk, M., Williams, L. J., Jacka, F. N., O’Neil, A., Pasco, J. A., Moylan, S., … Maes, M. (2013). So depression is an inflammatory disease, but where does the inflammation come from? BMC Medicine, 11, 200. http://doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-11-200
 
Christodoulou, S., Goula, T., Ververidis, A., & Drosos, G. (2013). Vitamin D and Bone Disease. BioMed Research International, 2013, 396541. http://doi.org/10.1155/2013/396541
 
Del Pinto, R., Ferri, C., & Cominelli, F. (2017). Vitamin D Axis in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Role, Current Uses and Future Perspectives. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 18(11), 2360. http://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18112360
 
Du Toitc, G., Foongc, R,-X.M. & Lack, G. (2016). Prevention of food allergy – Early dietary interventions. Allergology International. 65(4), 370–377. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.alit.2016.08.001
 
Examine.com, Vitamin D. Accessed Feb 2, 2018. LINK:  https://examine.com/supplements/Vitamin+D/
 
Farrokhyar F, Tabasinejad R, Dao D, Peterson D, Ayeni OR, Hadioonzadeh R, Bhandari M. Prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in athletes: a systematic-review and meta-analysis. Sports Med. 2015 Mar;45(3):365-78. doi: 10.1007/s40279-014-0267-6. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25277808
 
Fulgoni, V. L., Keast, D. R., Bailey, R. L., & Dwyer, J. (2011). Foods, Fortificants, and Supplements: Where Do Americans Get Their Nutrients? The Journal of Nutrition, 141(10), 1847–1854. http://doi.org/10.3945/jn.111.142257
 
Gittoes, N.J. (2015). Vitamin D--what is normal according to latest research and how should we deal with it? Clin Med (Lond). 15 Suppl 6:s54-7. doi: 10.7861/clinmedicine.15-6-s54. LINK:  http://www.clinmed.rcpjournal.org/content/15/Suppl_6/s54.long
 
Glade, M.J. (2013). Vitamin D: health panacea or false prophet? Nutrition. 29(1):37-41. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2012.05.010.
 
Grace-Farfaglia, P. (2015). Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review. Nutrients, 7(5), 3347–3369. http://doi.org/10.3390/nu7053347
 
Haq, A., Svobodová, J., Imran, S. Stanford, C. & Razzaque, M.S. (2016). Vitamin D deficiency: A single centre analysis of patients from 136 countries. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 164, 209-213. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.02.007
 
Health Canada. (2012). Do Canadian Adults Meet Their Nutrient Requirements Through Food Intake Alone? Cat. No.: H164-112/3-2012E-PDF ISBN: 978-1-100-20026-2
 
Kjærgaard, M., Waterloo, K., Wang, C.E., Almås, B., Figenschau, Y., Hutchinson, M.S., Svartberg, J. & Jorde, R. (2012). Effect of vitamin D supplement on depression scores in people with low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D: nested case-control study and randomised clinical trial. Br J Psychiatry. 201(5):360-8.
 
Kramer, C.K., Ye, C., Swaminathan, B., Hanley, A.J., Connelly, P.W., Sermer, M., Zinman, B. & Retnakaran, R. (2016). The persistence of maternal vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency during pregnancy and lactation irrespective of season and supplementation. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 84(5):680-6. doi: 10.1111/cen.12989. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26641010
 
Meeker, S., Seamons, A., Maggio-Price, L., & Paik, J. (2016). Protective links between vitamin D, inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 22(3), 933–948. http://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v22.i3.933
 
Narula, N. & Marshall, J.K. (2012). Management of inflammatory bowel disease with vitamin D: beyond bone health. J Crohns Colitis. 6(4):397-404. doi: 10.1016/j.crohns.2011.10.015.
 
National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Vitamin D. Accessed Jan 29, 2018.
 
Pet, M.A. & Brouwer-Brolsma, E.M. (2016). The Impact of Maternal Vitamin ,D Status on Offspring Brain Development and Function: a Systematic Review. Adv Nutr. 7(4):665-78. doi: 10.3945/an.115.010330. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942857/
 
Pilz, S., Grübler, M., Gaksch, M., Schwetz, V., Trummer, C., Hartaigh, B.Ó., Verheyen, N., Tomaschitz, A. &  März, W. (2016). Vitamin D and Mortality. Anticancer Research. 36(3), 1379-1387.
 
Reid, I.R. (2016). What diseases are causally linked to vitamin D deficiency? Arch Dis Child. 101(2):185-9. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2014-307961.
 
Rimmelzwaan, L.M., van Schoor, N.M., Lips, P., Berendse, H.W. & Eekhoff, E.M. (2016). Systematic Review of the Relationship between Vitamin D and Parkinson's Disease. J Parkinsons Dis. 6(1):29-37. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4927872/
 
Rudders, S.A. & Camargo, C.A.Jr. (2015). Sunlight, vitamin D and food allergy. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 15(4):350-7. doi: 10.1097/ACI.0000000000000177. LINK:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26110686
 
Ryan, J.W., Anderson, P.H., Turner, A.G. & Morris, H.A. (2013). Vitamin D activities and metabolic bone disease. Clin Chim Acta. 425:148-52. doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2013.07.024. 
 
Schoenmakers, I., Gousias, P. Jones, K.S. & Prentice, A. (2016). Prediction of winter vitamin D status and requirements in the UK population based on 25(OH) vitamin D half-life and dietary intake data. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 164, 218-222. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2016.03.015
 
Shang, M., & Sun, J. (2017). Vitamin D/VDR, probiotics, and gastrointestinal diseases. Current Medicinal Chemistry, 24(9), 876–887. http://doi.org/10.2174/0929867323666161202150008
 
Ticinesi, A., Meschi, T., Lauretani, F., Felis, G., Franchi, F., Pedrolli, C., Barichella, M., Benati, G., Di Nuzzo, S., Ceda, G.P. & Maggio, M. (2016). Nutrition and Inflammation in Older Individuals: Focus on Vitamin D, n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Whey Proteins. Nutrients, 8(4), 186; doi: 10.3390/nu8040186
 
Wang, Q., He, Y., Shen, Y., Zhang, Q., Chen, D., Zuo, C., … Yu, Y. (2014). Vitamin D Inhibits COX-2 Expression and Inflammatory Response by Targeting Thioesterase Superfamily Member 4. The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 289(17), 11681–11694. http://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M113.517581
 
Whiting, S. J., Kohrt, W. M., Warren, M. P., Kraenzlin, M. I., & Bonjour, J.-P. (2016). Food fortification for bone health in adulthood: a scoping review. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70(10), 1099–1105. http://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2016.42
Thursday, 07 November 2019 16:56

Immune System Support

Well the cold weather is here, seems like it is going to remain cold and wet for the next few months.

So many people have been asking me what I suggest to keep you healthy and free of the cold and flu this winter. 
I often like to increase my vitamin C and vitamin D over the colder months, and I will also add in probiotics and the occasional shot of oil of oregano or elderberry syrup. 
I carry professional grade supplements in my practice as well I have an online portal where you can sign up and have similar products shipped right to your down via Fullscript.​
I use only the best supplements to support your wellbeing, better value for the hard earned money you spend.  Nutritionist approved strategies to help your body return to balance.
Wishing you health and wellness,
Deanna Trask RHN
Holistic Nutritionist
Serving Owen Sound and Grey Bruce as well as across Canada with an online health portal.
Wednesday, 16 October 2019 19:48

These Foods Slow your Metabolism

If your metabolism is healthy and running as it should, it burns off your calories and keeps you feeling excellent. Exercise and plenty of sleep also help your metabolism function optimally, but did you know that certain foods you eat could be sabotaging your efforts?
These foods could be slowing down that burn you count on your metabolism for to keep things running optimally. Are you consuming any of these metabolism-busters regularly? 
1. Refined grains
There's a difference between whole grains that fuel your body and refined grains. Refined grains are stripped of that necessary fibre and nutrients your body needs. These grains are refined in the interest of taste and texture, but they leave your metabolism slower. You can bypass this issue by choosing whole grains that haven't gone through the refining process. 
2. Sugary drinks
Sugar is dangerous, especially in liquid form. Sodas, energy drinks, or even sports drinks can all drag your metabolism down. If you want to make sure your efforts at the gym aren't wasted, stop drinking your calories. Save the sugar for a rare treat, like a little slice of birthday cake on your big day. It's a much better tradeoff!
3. Processed vegetable oils
They might sound healthy with names like sunflower oil or soybean oil. But these processed vegetable oils, which include canola oil, have a higher risk for heart disease. Choose coconut oil instead, which can speed up your metabolism to boot.
4. Artificial sweeteners
Perhaps the only thing worse than sugar itself is artificial sweeteners. You may think you're making a healthier choice, but choosing sucralose, aspartame, and saccharin are all linked to health issues you certainly want to avoid. They can also mess with the good bacteria in your gut, which could hinder your weight loss efforts.  Avoid artificial sweeteners -- if you need to use a sweetener, use something natural such as stevia, pure maple syrup or raw honey.
5. Non-organic produce
Organic produce might cost more, but in the end, you'll wind up spending less on healthcare by staying healthier. When you buy non-organic, you're getting more pesticides which slow down the metabolism, not to mention cause high insulin levels and glucose intolerance.  Organic produce is so readily available now that it isn't much more expensive than conventional items.  Take a look at the 2019 Clean Fifteen/Dirty Dozen list to see the items you should always buy organic, and the ones you can opt to buy conventionally. 
6. Granola
It seems like a healthy choice, but the granola you find in your supermarket often contains hidden sugars and added ingredients that don't do you any favours. When you take in more sugar than you think, you cause an overload known as leptin resistance. This makes you hungrier while slowing that metabolism to a crawl. If you love granola, you can make your own by selecting fresh seeds, nuts, and oats to enjoy the taste and get true health benefits.
Now that you know what foods might be doing your metabolism in cut them from your diet. If it's hard to rid soda from your life, start weaning until you no longer crave it. Replace it with water flavoured with fresh fruits, and you'll be on your way to looking and feeling better from the inside out! 
Deanna Trask RHN
Holistic Nutritionist
Serving Owen Sound, Grey Bruce as well as across Canada via my online telehealth portal.
I will help you discover the right foods to eat for your body to balance your blood sugar and hormones.  We will uncover the issues that are standing in the way to your increased health such as Digestive Issues and Food Sensitivities, Adrenal and Thyroid issues as well as Auto-Immune issues.
Wednesday, 16 October 2019 18:21

Top 10 Ways to Curb Over Eating

The key to successful weight control is learning to listen to your body’s cues. You want to eat when you feel hungry, but not famished. Feeling overly hungry can trigger overeating. The following tips can help you get in touch with the signs of hunger and satiety to prevent overeating:

1. Stick to a schedule - Plan to eat every three to four hours, stopping after dinner.

2. Include lean protein - Protein-rich foods such as lean meat, fish, poultry, egg whites, tofu, and legumes help you feel full longer because they require more time to digest and absorb than other nutrients. Divide your protein intake among three meals and two snacks. Protein-rich snack choices include nuts, soy nuts, edamame, hard-boiled eggs, part-skim cheese, yogurt and/or a protein bar.

3. Don’t skip protein at breakfast - Research suggests that eating lean protein in the morning keeps you satisfied longer than if eaten at other times of the day.

4. Choose low-glycemic foods - Avoid refined (white) and sugary foods. These are high-glycemic foods that cause blood glucose and insulin levels to spike after eating. In response to excess insulin, blood glucose levels drop more quickly over the next few hours, which can trigger hunger and overeating. Low-glycemic foods are more slowly digested and help keep hunger at bay. They include beans, lentils, nuts, pasta, brown rice, sweet potatoes, steel-cut or large-flake oatmeal, oat bran, Red River cereal, 100% bran cereals, yogurt, milk, unflavored soy milk, apples, oranges, peaches, pears, and berries.

5. Add grapefruit - People who eat grapefruit have significantly lower levels of insulin after eating which was thought to control hunger.

6. Spice up meals - Capsaicin, the component that gives red chili peppers their heat, can reduce hunger and increase calorie burning. Adding cayenne pepper to meals was effective at reducing appetite for fatty, salty and sweet foods, especially among people who did not consume it regularly.

7. Chew sugarless gum - A recent study found that chewing gum for one hour in the morning helped participants eat fewer calories at lunch. Chewing stimulates nerves in the jaw connected to the brain region that regulates satiety. 

8. Slow down - It takes roughly 20 minutes for appetite-related hormones to kick in and tell your brain you’ve had enough food. After every bite, put down your knife and fork, chew thoroughly and sip water. Do not pick up your utensils until your mouth is empty.

9. Savour your food and ban distractions - Eating in front of the television, while reading, or while driving leads to mindless eating. Reserve the kitchen or dining-room table for meals and pay attention to the delicious flavors and aromas in your meal.

10. Rate your hunger - Determine how hungry – or satisfied – you feel before you eat, halfway through a meal, and after you finish. Stop eating when you feel about 70% full.

Practice Mindful Eating.

Think you might need some guidance?  Work with me

Deanna Trask RHN  Holistic Nutritionist Owen Sound

I help women eliminate the obstacles to healthy and lasting weight loss.  When you know what to eat to balance your hormones and your blood sugar, weight loss happens fast.  You will gain more energy and you will sleep better too.  Your digestion will improve and you will have more energy to do the things you love.  You will also get rid of the stubborn belly fat that comes with years of imbalanced hormones.

Wednesday, 16 October 2019 18:02

Pumpkin Spice Coffee

When that first autumn chill is in the air, one of my favourite ways to warm up is with a pumpkin spiced latte. No, not the kind you get at Starbucks that's loaded with sugar. There's actually an incredibly simple way to make your own at home, without all the sugar. It'll make your kitchen smell like pumpkin pie, and warm you from the inside out with the grounding spices. It's a win-win, and I can't wait for you to try it! If you just want pumpkin spiced coffee (no latte), it's as simple as adding your favourite coffee to your coffee machine and sprinkling pumpkin pie spice into your coffee grounds. Start with 1/2 teaspoon at first and increase to your taste level. Brew the coffee with the pumpkin pie spice in the basket with your coffee grounds. If you'd like to make a latte out of it, use your handheld milk frother to froth almond milk. Pour over your freshly brewed coffee, sprinkle with pumpkin pie spice, and enjoy.

Wednesday, 16 October 2019 16:37

Slow Cooker Oatmeal

Now that autumn has arrived, and colder temperatures will only increase through the coming months -- having this slow cooker oatmeal recipe in your arsenal will benefit you for months on end. Slow Cooker Oatmeal Recipe: 1 1/2 cups gluten-free, organic, steel-cut oats 1/3 cup pure maple syrup 6 cups of coconut milk 1 tsp vanilla 1 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp nutmeg Spray slow cooker with olive oil spray, so it doesn't stick to sides. Combine all ingredients and add to slow cooker. Cook on high for 3-4 hours, stirring every hour or so. When desired thickness has occurred, your oatmeal is ready to enjoy. Add any fresh fruit or raw nut toppings you desire.
Friday, 11 October 2019 15:57

6 Healthy Ways to Thrive This Thanksgiving

Behold, the season of all the good food is upon us. I've spoken to so many of you about what your biggest health struggle is over the holidays, and inevitably, food is a huge one. You feel like you undo all of your hard work throughout the year in these last few months, only to start the new year off with new plans of getting your health in order again.

And the majority of us stay on that cycle for our whole lives. Sound familiar? I want you to feel like this year is different. Instead of throwing all caution to the wind and waiting for the new year to roll around, I want to help you find your perfect balance of feeling on track and still enjoying the heck out of those yummy holiday dishes. That’s why you should make sure to incorporate these healthy hacks into your Thanksgiving to survive the holiday as well as the others just around the bend.

1. Walk it off Instead of just lounging all day waiting for the big meal to arrive on the table, go for a walk. Actually, my favourite way to start Thanksgiving day is with a morning walk. It helps to set the tone for the day and feels great to start the day with some fresh air. In fact, involve your relatives and make it a family affair by taking a long stroll after the big meal, as well. Not only is it relaxing and good quality time, but it will also help you digest your food better.

2. Eat your breakfast You may think you’re heading things off at the pass by not eating breakfast, however by the time you get to that big Thanksgiving dinner, you’ll be so hungry you’ll likely overeat. Make a healthy breakfast choice, and have a hearty salad for lunch. It will keep your blood sugar balanced so you won’t become too hungry, and you'll have made great choices all day and can indulge a little at Thanksgiving dinner.

3. Lookout for the pitfalls of gravy Gravy is one of the things we look forward to at Thanksgiving -- a little extra flavor we don't typically have throughout the year. However, be mindful of what you use to portion your gravy on your plate. A large ladle can rack up an extra 800 calories, just for the ladle of gravy. Instead, grab a tablespoon and drizzle your gravy onto your plate. By using this hack, you’ll still get to enjoy everything else and get your gravy too -- guilt free.

4. Bring a healthy side If you’ve been invited to a Thanksgiving dinner, make your side dish something healthy. There are lots of tasty options that everyone will love -- make a salad with homemade dressing, or bake sweet potatoes and dress them with sprinkles of cinnamon. These are incredibly simple and loved by all, so you can't go wrong with either. You could also look up healthy Thanksgiving side items on Pinterest to find something a little fancier if you love spending time in the kitchen whipping up new things!

5. Savour the desserts This is not a free license to eat everything on the dessert table, however, if your grandma makes the best pumpkin pie, make sure you ration yourself some room to enjoy a small piece. See lots you want to try? Then take bite-sized samples of each, then sit and truly savour them. Don't overdo it, but enjoy those desserts you only get to have a few days per year.

Some people can eat what they want without worry -- but for many others, certain foods can trigger reactions. Some of those reactions could be mild to the point where you might not associate them with what you're eating, while others are more severe and could require medical attention.   What foods tend to be the root of common sensitivities? Take a look below and think about what you eat. If you've had any symptoms like diarrhea, rashes, headaches, bloating, fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain, acid reflux, a runny nose, skin flushing or acne after eating something, you might be sensitive to one of these foods or ingredients. The best way to find out is by doing an elimination diet to see what's causing it and getting with your doctor to help you sort it out. 
Have you been wanting to ditch the dairy and see what changes you notice? Or perhaps you want to try out a new recipe without setting off a food allergy, but you're allergic to one of the main ingredients in most recipes. It could even be that you're just one or two ingredients short of the recipe you want to try and don't have time to run to the store. For all these occasions and more, it's helpful to know a few common ingredient replacements to hack into your cooking skills. Whether your goal is to be healthier, to use what's already in your kitchen, or to avoid a food sensitivity issue, these ingredient swaps can help you be a master of ingredient disguises!