Friday, 10 March 2017 17:48

Raw Brownie Batter Bites

I love love, love, chocolate.  These tasty little bites are loaded with chocolatey goodness and antioxidants from the raw cacao nibs.  The addition of a little sea salt makes them addictive and good for balancing your electrolytes too.  ;)

Soaking the almonds allows for easier digestibility, and it is also easier on your food processor.  The dates are soaked as well and the water is dumped off.  You can save it to use in another recipe if you wish.

 
I used peanut butter for the nut butter as that was all I had on hand, but any type of nut butter would work here.  I'm not so good at measuring, I just throw things together and taste along the way, so if you want more of something (like cocoa) then just add it.  My tbsps were heaping!
 
 
Raw Brownie Batter Bites
 
1 1/4 cup dates (soaked)
1/4 cup nut butter
1 cup almonds (soaked)
3 tbsp cocoa powder (heaping)
1/2 cup hemp seeds
1/4 cup shredded coconut
1/4 cup oatmeal flakes
2-3 tbsp raw cacao nibs
1 tbsp maple syrup
1 tsp sea salt (to taste)
 
Soak the dates and almonds for 2-3 hours to soften the dates and to begin to activate the enzymes in the almonds for better digestibility. 
 
In a food processor, start with dates and nuts and keep adding till all ingredients are combined.  Roll into bite size balls and store in an airtight container.
Place the airtight container in the bottom of the freezer behind frozen vegetables so your kids don't find them.
 
 
Published in Protein Bars & Bites
Thursday, 03 March 2016 20:43

Best Foods to Beat Stress

 
 
Mood and food are intimately related as certain flavours and aromas trigger memories of special occasions and feelings of contentment. All emotions including stress and anxiety trigger chemical responses in our body as hormone levels fluctuate and the sympathetic “fight or flight” system kicks in.
 
With each meal, we have the opportunity to counteract or subdue the stress response with the foods we choose. Here are a few top picks for stress-busting foods:
 
Seeds and nuts. Don't let their high-calorie count deter you. Seeds and nuts contain valuable B vitamins and a hefty dose of magnesium to help you make calming neurotransmitters like serotonin. Magnesium along with calcium is also useful for relaxing tense muscles. Sprinkle some sunflower or pumpkin seeds onto your salad or nosh on a few almonds or walnuts before a long meeting.  Just remember to keep portions small as a little goes a long way.
 
100% whole grains. Women, in particular, are notorious for reaching for high-carbohydrate foods in times of turmoil. This craving may be the body's way of asking for more fuel in preparation for a “fight”. Carbs also boost leaves of feel-good serotonin. Choose whole grains like brown rice, 100% whole wheat bread or pasta for sustained fuel. For extra nutritional value, try ancient whole grains like quinoa, spelt, Kamut and amaranth which are higher in protein and antioxidants.
 
Fresh fruit. Speaking of antioxidants, boost your vitamin C intake with oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, kiwis and cantaloupe. Prolonged stress depletes levels of vitamin C as the body's defences against free radicals get worn down. At the beginning of a stressful week, make a big fruit salad with seasonal berries, melon balls and grapes to have ready for snacking or packing. Vitamin C from whole foods give you the added benefit of fibre that you don't get from juice or supplements.
 
70% cocoa chocolate. Stressful times call for a little indulgence so make your special treat count towards correcting the biochemical imbalances created by stress. Dark chocolate has been making headlines for helping with blood pressure reduction however researchers are also finding that this healthful food contains natural anti-depressants like phenylethylalamine. Like seeds and nuts a little goes a long way so keep your indulgence to no more than 40 grams (1.4 ounces) per day.
 
Published in Deanna's Blog